Speed dating new york city reviews

When you write a dating blog, speed dating is part of the territory.And so for the last 2 years, I’ve attended more speed dating events than I can count. ‘Elite’ speed dating, silent speed dating, blind speed dating, paper bag speed dating, cycle speed dating, literary speed dating … But no matter the gimmick, it always seems to come down to the same brutal truth. Speed dating originated in 1998, and was set up by an American rabbi, as a way for young, single Jewish people to meet one another.Creating an atmosphere that is at once casual and comfortable. For those that prefer the same simplified experience in matchmaking we offer our 'Date Nights' free of contracts or commitments.It's as simple as selecting your package, telling us your preferences and allowing us to arrange the evening. We are regularly approached by venues looking to have the cheekiest in the world of dating to their spots.But as the years have gone on, the popularity of speed dating has dwindled … Unfortunately, the reality of modern-day speed dating, is that whilst most of the events take place in bars, the general crowd, particularly the men, are not people who are comfortable in bars.The very nature of speed dating means you have a captive audience.“I think you can get a vibe and an energy, whether you’d be a good fit ornot.” I ask her about the guy she was just talking to. You really have to put yourself out there,” she says.

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Instead we focus on creating an atmosphere conducive to meeting others; a great venue, a personable host and a staff to assist.A member of the opposite sex has to talk to you for at least four minutes, and so this encourages the most nervous types of daters.People who wouldn’t normally approach the opposite sex in the real world. But the problem with speed dating, is that often the women who are attracted to speed dating events are VERY different to the men.When I arrive at the Montrose, a Scottish pub in Park Slope, I’m relieved to see there’s no five-minute bell, no mad dash for the next interview, no frenzied attempt to impress. I ask her if it’s disappointing to hear that people are finding someone to work with while she’s still looking. (Well, not the frenzied part, anyway.) Instead, there are white name tags for those who have a place to offer, and pink for those looking.

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